3 artists, 3 styles, but no name for the show

A new exhibit with no name, but with three artists displaying different styles is now running at the Chadds Ford Gallery.

The exhibit features the works of Jacalyn Beam, Bradley Hendershot, and Carolyn Anderson. Beam is a plein air — painting outdoors — impressionist and Hendershot is a representational watercolorist.

Anderson did not attend the Oct. 10 opening, but Gallery Director Barbara Moore describes her work as “fresh and alive. The immediacy of the moment gives you the splash. She’s probably Delaware’s most famous artist,” Moore said.

 Bradley Hendershot says his work "Divided"represents political division in the country.

Bradley Hendershot says his work "Divided"represents political division in the country.

Hendershot, who spends half his time in Maine and the other half in Pennsylvania, said his representational style is more realistic, yet more intimate. He said he’s attracted to scenes that are important to him, scenes that tell a story.

He pointed to a piece he titled “Divided.” The painting simply depicts a house along the coast of Maine on a sunny day. But, he said, “It’s a political statement. It shows how divided we are in the country.”

A U.S. flag is partially blocked by a post, while the electrical box represents the power in Washington, D.C. An open window on the second floor represents the airing out of change in the nation, he said.

If his last name is familiar, it might be because his father, Ray Hendershot, is also a well-known watercolorist. The father/son duo have previously displayed together at the gallery.

Beam is probably the most recognizable to local art fans. She, too, has displayed at the gallery before, and she also chairs plein air fund-raising events at the Chadds Ford Historical Society.

She has a special affinity for plein air painting. She said that by working outside she can better capture the mood of a scene as she experiences the weather, the time of day and year.

“I keep going back to the same scene and every time I paint it, it will be different,” she said.

As an example, Beam spoke about her piece “Fairville Bank Barn,” saying the weather change while she was on site gave the painting an entirely different feeling.

Jacalyn Beam's "Fairville Bank Bark" reflects the feel of a damp day as on;y plein air can.

Jacalyn Beam's "Fairville Bank Bark" reflects the feel of a damp day as on;y plein air can.

“You can sense the dampness. It’s what comes through,” Beam said.

The exhibit runs through Oct. 26.

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About Rich Schwartzman

Rich Schwartzman has been reporting on events in the greater Chadds Ford area since September 2001 when he became the founding editor of The Chadds Ford Post. In April 2009 he became managing editor of ChaddsFordLive. He is also an award-winning photographer.

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